ONTD Political

Fairy wrens teach secret passwords to their unborn chicks to tell them apart from cuckoo impostors

9:21 pm - 11/15/2012
In Australia, a pair of superb fairy-wrens return to their nest with food for their newborn chick. As they arrive, the chick makes its begging call. It’s hard to see in the darkness of the domed nest, but the parents know that something isn’t right. Whatever’s in their nest, it’s not their chick. It doesn’t’ know the secret password. They abandon it, flying off to start a new nest and a new family somewhere else.

It was a good call. The bird in their nest was a Horsfield’s bronze-cuckoo. These birds are “brood parasites” – they lay their eggs in those of other birds, passing on their parenting duties to some unwitting surrogates. The bronze-cuckoo egg looks very much like a fairy-wren egg, although it tends to hatch earlier. The cuckoo chick then ejects its foster siblings from the nest, so it can monopolise its foster parents’ attention.

But fairy-wrens have a way of telling their chicks apart from cuckoos. Diane Colombelli-Negrel from Flinders University in Australia has shown that mothers sing a special tune to their eggs before they’ve hatched. This “incubation call” contains a special note that acts like a familial password. The embryonic chicks learn it, and when they hatch, they incorporate it into their begging calls. Horsfield’s bronze-cuckoos lay their eggs too late in the breeding cycle for their chicks to pick up the same notes. They can’t learn the password in time, and their identities can be rumbled.

This is one of many incredible adaptations in the long-running battle between birds and their brood parasite. As these evolutionary arms races continue, the parasites typically become ever better mimics, and the hosts typically become ever more discerning parents.

This battle usually plays out before the eggs hatch. If the parents can recognise the parasitic eggs, they’ll eject or destroy them. If they can’t, they often end up feeding the parasite regardless of what it looks like. This is why the common cuckoo has an egg that closely matches that of a reed warbler, but the cuckoo chick is a huge, grey monster that looks completely unlike a warbler chick.

But the fairy-wrens are different. In 2003, Naomi Langmore found that they will abandon 40 percent of nests that only have a Horsfield bronze-cuckoo chick in it, suggesting that they can indeed recognise these interlopers. Now, Colombelli-Negrel has discovered how they do it.

She kept 15 nests under constant audio surveillance, and discovered that fairy-wrens call to their unhatched chicks, using a two-second trill with 19 separate elements to it. They call once every four minutes while sitting on their eggs, starting on the 9th day of incubation and carrying on for a week until the eggs hatch.

When Colombelli-Negrel recorded the chicks after they hatched, she heard that their begging call included a single unique note lifted from mum’s incubation call. This note varies a lot between different fairy-wren broods. It’s their version of a surname, a signature of identity that unites a family. The females even teach these calls to their partners, by using them in their own begging calls when the males return to the nest with food.

These signature calls aren’t innate. The chicks’ calls more precisely matched those of their mother if she sang more frequently while she was incubating. And when Colombelli-Negrel swapped some eggs between different clutches, she found that the chicks made signature calls that matches those of their foster parents rather than those of their biological ones. It’s something they learn while still in their eggs.

This also explains why bronze-cuckoos don’t make the same calls. The female bronze-cuckoo tends to deposit her eggs while a fairy-wren’s clutch is around 12 days old. At this point, they’re just a couple of days away from hatching. “The cuckoo embryo appears to have insufficient time to correctly learn the password note,” says Sonia Kleindorfer, who led the study.

When they hatch, the fairy-wrens can tell that something isn’t right. They spend less time feeding their alien chick, more time making alarm calls, and more time scanning the surrounding area, possibly on the lookout for more cuckoos. In many cases, they abandon the intruder to make a fresh start elsewhere.

This isn’t a clear win for the fairy-wrens. Colombelli-Negrel found very low levels of cuckoo parasitism in her study, but Langmore previously showed that only 40 percent of the wrens abandon their cuckoo-infested nests. “There appear to be cyclical fluctuations in cuckoo prevalance in host nests across years,” says Kleindorfer. This might be because the local wrens become better or worse at recognising their signature notes, or the cuckoos become better or worse at mimicking them. “Our study provides a testable framework to explain some of this variation.”

Reference: Colombelli-Negrel, Hauber, Robertson, Sulloway, Hoi, Griggio & Kleindorfer. 2012. Embryonic Learning of Vocal Passwords in Superb Fairy-Wrens Reveals Intruder Cuckoo Nestlings. Current Biology (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2012.09.025

Not Exactly Rocket Science
chaya 16th-Nov-2012 03:07 pm (UTC)
Cut pls
jettakd 16th-Nov-2012 03:18 pm (UTC)
THIS IS SO COOL <3 I knew I loved fairy wrens, this is amazing!
mangosorbet007 16th-Nov-2012 03:37 pm (UTC)
They're not called "superb" for no reason. :-)
hinoema 16th-Nov-2012 03:47 pm (UTC)
What amazes me is that the chicks can learn in the shell. That's shades of Cyteen, right there.
rhysande 16th-Nov-2012 05:58 pm (UTC)
CJ Cherryh reference! :D :D :D
hinoema 16th-Nov-2012 06:35 pm (UTC)
If they ever made a Cyteen movie (and did it right) I'd watch the shit out of that thing. :D
rhysande 16th-Nov-2012 06:57 pm (UTC)
Movies, series, or animated series, any or all three if done right. It's a mystery to me why none of her books have ever been picked up and filmed. The world-building, characters, relationships, and action in the Cyteen, Foreigner, Hammerfall, Faded Sun, Morgaine and Merovingian Nights series are so rich and complex.
fenris_lorsrai 16th-Nov-2012 07:53 pm (UTC)
I think its largely technical issues up to this point. Very little heavy scifi has made it to the screen because of the technical issues, especially with aliens that can't just be done as "guy in suit" or that have really huge set pieces. and American studios basically seem to think animation has cooties.

we're getting to point where that's a lot more doable, both affordably AND believably, but studios are still awfully gunshy about that type of investment. (and that John Carter of mars tanked, probably sank a bunch of possible in development stuff)

Plus you have issue of a lot of these the main characters aren't white males. If the alien isn't recognizable as "big star" why would they make the movie? They barely make movies with female leads. aliens? Hell no!

Plus the issue of licensing. Can we sell kids action figures?

I love the Cherryh stuff but I'm iffy on it hitting big or small screen anytime soonish. Some more conventional heavy scifi stuff needs to come out and make big money first before they start getting into that.

I think the Known Space stuff has a better shot of hitting screen first, particularly the Man-Kzin wars stuff. Close enough body plan for motion capture to work, lots of fighting. also, action figures. (the one appearance on Star Trek the animated series doesn't count)

Edited at 2012-11-16 07:54 pm (UTC)
rhysande 17th-Nov-2012 01:10 am (UTC)
Ten years ago I would have agreed with you. But we've done Alien(s), Predator, Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and Babylon Five, Stargate whatever, Star Trek whatever, Farscape, Firefly, Dr. Who and so much more at this point. We've come a long way when it comes to CGI and FX. It's doable.

I wish it wasn't still necessary to have a white, male lead, but I know that it's still rare for a show with a nonwhite lead to be as successful. It's happened, though, and I hope those successes are remembered when casting future sci-fi shows. I don't think that's much of an issue with most of Cherryh's books, however. Cherryh populates her books with a lot of characters of mixed race and ethnicity.

If it were possible to get an Ilisidi figurine I would be all over that so fast - and I've gotten to the point I don't buy anything I have to dust.
carmy_w 16th-Nov-2012 09:36 pm (UTC)
They aren't the only breed that does this. There's a documentary called "My Life as a Turkey" that shows this with a guy who hatches a nest of turkey eggs and raises the chicks.

During incubation, he clucked to them every time he turned the eggs. When they hatched, they looked around, lost, till he clucked. They turned right to him and imprinted. They already knew his call.
daladoir 16th-Nov-2012 03:52 pm (UTC)


Edited at 2012-11-16 03:53 pm (UTC)
tabaqui 16th-Nov-2012 05:53 pm (UTC)
*flails*

Cherryh reference!
vanishingbee 16th-Nov-2012 04:53 pm (UTC)
well now that's awesome
castalianspring 16th-Nov-2012 05:30 pm (UTC)
*shameless plug* This sort of thing would be very welcome over at ontd_science! */shameless plug*

Edited at 2012-11-16 05:30 pm (UTC)
effervescent 16th-Nov-2012 05:49 pm (UTC)
I thought that that was what I was reading, at first :D
fenris_lorsrai 16th-Nov-2012 06:26 pm (UTC)
me too!
the_physicist 16th-Nov-2012 06:31 pm (UTC)
confused here too! XD
crossfire 16th-Nov-2012 06:55 pm (UTC)
*high five*
castalianspring 16th-Nov-2012 09:36 pm (UTC)
*fist bump*
effervescent 16th-Nov-2012 05:49 pm (UTC)
This is awesome. :D
tabaqui 16th-Nov-2012 05:55 pm (UTC)
It says they' abandon forty percent of nests - does that mean the fairy-wren chicks are left to die, or they move them to a new nest?

And at the end there it says they 'abandon the intruder to make a fresh start' - again, which chicks die and do they find/build a new nest and move their own, or what?

This is very, very cool but also a little horrifying if there are nests full of starving, abandoned chicks.
zanbam 16th-Nov-2012 06:11 pm (UTC)
Cuckoo chicks hatch earlier than the host chicks so, and push the unhatched eggs out of the nest. So no, the fairy wren chicks don't starve, mostly cause they're splattered on the ground. The cuckoo chick does starve, but I doubt the incubating birds care. Welcome to nature.
tabaqui 16th-Nov-2012 06:26 pm (UTC)
Ah. It made it seem that the wren and cuckoo chicks were in the nest at the same time.

Oh, i know nature doesn't care, but it's still horrifying.
lil_insanity 16th-Nov-2012 06:17 pm (UTC)
Yeah, that makes me sad. :(
tabaqui 16th-Nov-2012 06:27 pm (UTC)
Yeah. 'Nature, red in tooth and claw' is how it is, but it's depressing, heh.
fenris_lorsrai 16th-Nov-2012 06:21 pm (UTC)
Generally the cuckoos hatch first (and are bigger) so either break open the other eggs or shove the other hatchlings out. So all they'd be abandoning is murderous cuckoo chick that if it hasn't killed all their hatchlings already, would do so shortly. and would grow up to do the same to more wrens.


tabaqui 16th-Nov-2012 06:25 pm (UTC)
Okay. The article made it seem that the wrens and cuckoos were in the nest at the same time.
rylee900 19th-Nov-2012 03:57 am (UTC)
Aw :( it made me sad when the mama bird was trying to stop the chick from killing her baby
I know it's nature but still D':
romp 17th-Nov-2012 02:34 am (UTC)
Yeah, I'll be careful if I'm ever in Australia and want to peer into a nest. D:
akashasheiress 16th-Nov-2012 06:28 pm (UTC)
This is fascinating! Although I can't help but feel sad for the abandoned cuckoo chick. It's not its fault it's a murderer (Now, there's an odd sentence to write...). It's just trying to survive.:(

I also can't help but admire it a wee bit. Maybe there's a reason I was sorted into Slytherin on Pottermore...

Edited at 2012-11-16 06:36 pm (UTC)
lizzy_someone 17th-Nov-2012 12:33 am (UTC)
BIOLOGY!! It is the coolest!
zinnia_rose 17th-Nov-2012 01:50 am (UTC)
But if the cuckoo chick dies after being abandoned because it doesn't have the secret password, where is the evolutionary advantage to laying the egg there in the first place? Or is the secret password fairly recently evolved and the cuckoo moms haven't had time to catch up yet?
romp 17th-Nov-2012 02:39 am (UTC)
Well, that ends the Intelligent Design argument.
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