ONTD Political

by Garry Wills

(for which see Leviticus 18.21, 20.1-5). The sacrifice referred to was of living children consumed in the fires of offering to Moloch. Ever since then, worship of Moloch has been the sign of a deeply degraded culture. Ancient Romans justified the destruction of Carthage by noting that children were sacrificed to Moloch there. Milton represented Moloch as the first pagan god who joined Satan’s war on humankind:

First Moloch, horrid king, besmear’d with blood
Of human sacrifice, and parents’ tears,
Though for the noise of Drums and Timbrels loud
Their children’s cries unheard, that pass’d through fire
To his grim idol. (Paradise Lost 1.392-96)


Read again those lines, with recent images seared into our brains—“besmeared with blood” and “parents’ tears.” They give the real meaning of what happened at Sandy Hook Elementary School Friday morning. That horror cannot be blamed just on one unhinged person. It was the sacrifice we as a culture made, and continually make, to our demonic god. We guarantee that crazed man after crazed man will have a flood of killing power readily supplied him. We have to make that offering, out of devotion to our Moloch, our god. The gun is our Moloch. We sacrifice children to him daily—sometimes, as at Sandy Hook, by directly throwing them into the fire-hose of bullets from our protected private killing machines, sometimes by blighting our children’s lives by the death of a parent, a schoolmate, a teacher, a protector. Sometimes this is done by mass killings (eight this year), sometimes by private offerings to the god (thousands this year).

The gun is not a mere tool, a bit of technology, a political issue, a point of debate. It is an object of reverence. Devotion to it precludes interruption with the sacrifices it entails. Like most gods, it does what it will, and cannot be questioned. Its acolytes think it is capable only of good things. It guarantees life and safety and freedom. It even guarantees law. Law grows from it. Then how can law question it?

Its power to do good is matched by its incapacity to do anything wrong. It cannot kill. Thwarting the god is what kills. If it seems to kill, that is only because the god’s bottomless appetite for death has not been adequately fed. The answer to problems caused by guns is more guns, millions of guns, guns everywhere, carried openly, carried secretly, in bars, in churches, in offices, in government buildings. Only the lack of guns can be a curse, not their beneficent omnipresence.

Adoration of Moloch permeates the country, imposing a hushed silence as he works his will. One cannot question his rites, even as the blood is gushing through the idol’s teeth. The White House spokesman invokes the silence of traditional in religious ceremony. “It is not the time” to question Moloch. No time is right for showing disrespect for Moloch.

The fact that the gun is a reverenced god can be seen in its manifold and apparently resistless powers. How do we worship it? Let us count the ways:

1. It has the power to destroy the reasoning process. It forbids making logical connections. We are required to deny that there is any connection between the fact that we have the greatest number of guns in private hands and the greatest number of deaths from them. Denial on this scale always comes from or is protected by religious fundamentalism. Thus do we deny global warming, or evolution, or biblical errancy. Reason is helpless before such abject faith.

2. It has the power to turn all our politicians as a class into invertebrate and mute attendants at the shrine. None dare suggest that Moloch can in any way be reined in without being denounced by the pope of this religion, National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre, as trying to destroy Moloch, to take away all guns. They whimper and say they never entertained such heresy. Many flourish their guns while campaigning, or boast that they have themselves hunted “vermin.” Better that the children die or their lives be blasted than that a politician should risk an election against the dread sentence of NRA excommunication.

3. It has the power to distort our constitutional thinking. It says that the right to “bear arms,” a military term, gives anyone, anywhere in our country, the power to mow down civilians with military weapons. Even the Supreme Court has been cowed, reversing its own long history of recognizing that the Second Amendment applied to militias. Now the court feels bound to guarantee that any every madman can indulge his “religion” of slaughter. Moloch brooks no dissent, even from the highest court in the land.

Though LaPierre is the pope of this religion, its most successful Peter the Hermit, preaching the crusade for Moloch, was Charlton Heston, a symbol of the Americanism of loving guns. I have often thought that we should raise a statue of Heston at each of the many sites of multiple murders around our land. We would soon have armies of statues, whole droves of Heston acolytes standing sentry at the shrines of Moloch dotting the landscape. Molochism is the one religion that can never be separated from the state. The state itself bows down to Moloch, and protects the sacrifices made to him. So let us celebrate the falling bodies and rising statues as a demonstration of our fealty, our bondage, to the great god Gun.

December 15, 2012, 5:25 p.m.

Source

This is probably one of the most frighteningly accurate analogies ever for gun culture in the US.
fenris_lorsrai 18th-Dec-2012 07:17 pm (UTC)
I wish to staple this piece to some people's foreheads.

That said, the way around the gun lobby may be to tax the unliving shit out of AMMO. you have a right to bear arms. don't say nothing about premade ammo since that wasn't really a thing back when it was written. and you outright ban certain types.

any sale of ammo, taxed just like cigarettes. (so a flat plus a very steep percentage) You can buy black powder without tax. Certain groups can apply for an exemption to the ammo tax like the military, law enforcement, ROTC program, group training for shooting in the olympics, etc, situations where they will be going through a large number of rounds in a WELL REGULATED environment.

why no tax on black powder? since that was largely what writers of constitution were familiar with, we'll assume that was included with your arms. lots of people doing subsistence level hunting still use this system OR they can pack their own rounds if they wish. and they're generally a relatively slow reload.

someone very determined to have a lot of ammo without paying taxes can still sit there packing rounds at home, but it extends the process quite a bit. and yes, of course you can have people sitting at home packing rounds for things no longer available on civilian market... but it greatly increases the chance of misfire.

yes, you would have a black market for ammo (you do now, anyway) but this happens with any taxed product. and black market ammo again has a higher chance of misfire which, if we want to cut the effectiveness of guns as a means of killing people, is a good thing.




jettakd 18th-Dec-2012 07:20 pm (UTC)
This is actually a really good plan. And I can maybe see it getting through legislation easier.
pepsquad 18th-Dec-2012 07:22 pm (UTC)
you know the reply would be well should we tax all writing implements besides the quill and the printing press?
jettakd 18th-Dec-2012 07:24 pm (UTC)
But what reasons would they have to say that? There were lots of car deaths, so we regulated driving and safety rules and they dropped. Cigarettes started causing cancer, but instead of outlawing that we just tax it. And we have age and certain limitations on alcohol.

I can see them bringing up false comparisons for like auto deaths or something, but not a pen cause that doesn't kill people?
pepsquad 18th-Dec-2012 07:29 pm (UTC)
I didn't say i understand the logic but that will be the next talking point.
fenris_lorsrai 18th-Dec-2012 08:10 pm (UTC)
but the pen is mightier than the sword, so clearly pens are DEADLY WEAPONS!

squeeful 18th-Dec-2012 07:23 pm (UTC)
I'd like to add on that ammo rolling should only be done in a licensed, designated area as it's a fairly dangerous activity.
betray802 20th-Dec-2012 12:34 am (UTC)
And all I can think of is the years my father's been doing it right in the house, without a care. Smoking away a pack of Winstons while he's at it. For the first six years of my life, we lived in a 12X60 mobile home. His 'gun bench' was right in the bloody kitchen!

Before my arrival, but there was an incident where he was casting his own bullets and it went wrong, prompting my mother to demand that he buy premade bullets, though he could continue to load his own shells.

O'course, his answer to Sandy Hook is "Armed guards! Arm the Socialist, gay-teaching, Sharia-loving, tree-hugging Union thug teachers! Teach children to shoot! God in schools! Lynch the gays!"
romp 19th-Dec-2012 03:23 am (UTC)
I agree with a work-around for sustenance hunting.
angry_chick 19th-Dec-2012 05:43 am (UTC)
I agree with this hugely.
celtic_thistle 19th-Dec-2012 06:07 pm (UTC)
Yeah, I think the ammo idea is a great one.
thenakedcat 19th-Dec-2012 07:21 pm (UTC)
I very much agree with this. Ammo is a good choke point to exploit and subsistence hunters already often use muzzleloaders or even hunt with bows, which are kind of the ultimate in slow reload time/lowered lethality of accidental discharge.
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