ONTD Political

As U.S. Workplaces Celebrate March Madness, RiseSmart Brings the Fun and Excitement of the NCAA Offi

10:23 am - 03/14/2012
As millions of U.S. workers begin filling out NCAA tournament brackets to celebrate March Madness, RiseSmart, the leading provider of next-generation outplacement solutions, today launched the RiseSmart Challenge, a March Madness "office pool" for all transitioning workers utilizing its flagship outplacement solution, Transition Concierge. The program serves as a fun way to help unemployed workers take a break from the job search to participate in one of the traditional rites of American office life.

"March Madness marks an exciting time in which offices are abuzz with colleagues engaged in heated water-cooler debates over who will make the Final Four and be crowned champion," said Sanjay Sathe, founder and CEO of RiseSmart. "We wanted to offer those in the Transition Concierge program the chance to experience this same sense of fun even while they are between jobs. So we created the RiseSmart Challenge."

The RiseSmart Challenge is open to thousands of transitioning workers currently in the Transition Concierge system. Participants can access the RiseSmart Challenge tournament bracket online; top prognosticators will receive special recognition and prizes.

"In our five years of helping put Americans back to work, we've found that the unemployed find work faster when they treat their job search with a sense of adventure and fun. We try to create an atmosphere that encourages this positive approach," Sathe said. "The RiseSmart Challenge is a fun way to lift the spirits of workers in transition and energize them for the real challenge ahead - reentering the workforce."

A 2011 Harris Interactive survey showed that 20 percent of U.S. workers - or about 30 million Americans -- participate in a March Madness office pool. RiseSmart encourages companies to embrace this annual tradition by enacting a program that builds interpersonal relationships across the organization and instills a sense of belonging and fun. Banning pools in an attempt to prevent lost productivity during the tournament is generally ineffective and can result in reduced morale.

Market Watch [press release]
mollywobbles867 14th-Mar-2012 04:32 pm (UTC)


Wait...there's another March Madness?
lafinjack 14th-Mar-2012 05:09 pm (UTC)
For longer than she's been alive, apparently.
jettakd 14th-Mar-2012 04:53 pm (UTC)
Could someone explain to me what March Madness actually is? It has something to do with basketball?
layweed 14th-Mar-2012 05:07 pm (UTC)
Collegiate basketball championship tournament thing.
jettakd 14th-Mar-2012 05:10 pm (UTC)
Ooooh okay.

I really don't understand stuff like this. Or fantasy football. So thanks for explaining XD
fenris_lorsrai 14th-Mar-2012 07:02 pm (UTC)
Yep. March Madness traditionally refers to the MEN's basketball tournament, but some areas the womens basketball tournament may attract as much attention.

General idea is to predict who will will win, but there may also be additional small prizes for getting the ticket right in each round. Biggest prize usually goes to the person that guesses ALL matches right. There may be extra prizes for guessing the final score. Smaller pools generally have smaller prizes and may only award for guessing the eventual winner.

it's rather like horceracing. Small prizes for guessing each race correctly, big one for guessing ALL the races correctly.
jettakd 14th-Mar-2012 07:04 pm (UTC)
OH okay! I get it now! I hate sports and don't like gambling, so this is all madness to me XD
firerosearien 14th-Mar-2012 09:39 pm (UTC)
Yep. I live in CT right now and the UConn women's team is a HUGE DEAL up here (even though the men's team won the whole thing last year.)

I'm a Syracuse fan so I'm deep in enemy territory =o
etherealtsuki 14th-Mar-2012 09:03 pm (UTC)
The funny thing is there two male basketball championships but this is for the NCAA Basketball championship aka the Big Dance. The other is usually known as a "loser tourney", the NIT, which they are trying to remarket as the Little Dance.

No one really watches for the actual play unless you're a fan of the teams but it's more gambling than anything.
kahluaandcream HOYA SAXA!14th-Mar-2012 07:23 pm (UTC)
Honestly I never really got March Madness until recently, it helps to have a team to root for instead of just rooting against Duke at all times. But it's a nice way to support the unemployed. I'm confused about the buy-in though - do the unemployed have to pay to play, and if so why is this better than just setting up a free bracket on CBS Sports or Yahoo? Is it for fostering a community of the unemployed and what is the support system in place (can I smack talk on a forum or do groups get together to discuss, for example)?

Semi-OT prayer circle for Jack the Bulldog, who tore his doggie ACL and won't be traveling with the Georgetown men this year.

Happy Puppy! Hoya Saxa!
eyetosky 14th-Mar-2012 08:18 pm (UTC)
aka: When I start paying attention to fashion for FUG MADNESS.

Seriously, this is the only time I give a shit about pop culture or fashion, but one year I was looking up fashion week walks for a character design reference and now I am in-the-closet HOOKED.
anus 14th-Mar-2012 08:48 pm (UTC)
I've never cared for college sports, but since my school is still going strong my teacher cancelled class on Friday for the game HUZZAH BASKETBALL!
etherealtsuki 14th-Mar-2012 09:07 pm (UTC)
Meh, I don't really support the NCAA for their exploitive practices, but this is a nice gesture to give the unemployed some semblance of normalcy if they lost a job where March Madness was something that was popular in their offices.
firerosearien 14th-Mar-2012 09:40 pm (UTC)
The NCAA is a total crock that treats its athletes like slave labor.


That said, Go Syracuse!
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