ONTD Political

OBESE JOB APPLICANTS FACE BIAS: REPORT

9:58 am - 05/01/2012
Overweight women are being discriminated against when applying for jobs and receive lower starting salaries than their skinny colleagues, according to a new study.

Monash University, together with the University of Hawaii, examined whether a recently developed measure of anti-fat prejudice, the universal measure of bias (UMB), predicted workplace discrimination against obese people.

Lead researcher Kerry O'Brien, from the School of Political and Social Inquiry, said the nature of the study initially was concealed from the participants to avoid biased results.

Participants were shown a series of resumes that had a small photo of the supposed job applicant attached, and were asked to make ratings of the applicants' suitability, starting salary and employability.

"We used pictures of women pre-and post-bariatric surgery, and varied whether participants saw a resume that had a picture of an obese female attached, or the same female but in a normal weight range having undergone bariatric surgery," Dr O'Brien said.


"We found that obesity discrimination was displayed across all selection criteria, such as starting salary, leadership potential and likelihood of selection for the job."

The higher a participant's score on the UMB, the more likely they were to discriminate against obese candidates.

Dr O'Brien said one interpretation of this finding might be that we feel better about our own bodies if we compare ourselves to, and discriminate against, fatter people.

"The results suggest that a belief in the superiority of some individuals over others is related to the perception that obese individuals deserve fewer privileges and opportunities than non-fat individuals," he said.

He said the findings show that there is a clear need to address obesity discrimination, particularly against females, who tend to bear the brunt of anti-fat prejudice.




Disgusting.

source
mysticlady3 1st-May-2012 12:09 am (UTC)
How was it? Any tips, cause I have one tomorrow.
maianarisa 1st-May-2012 12:27 am (UTC)
Good luck!

Mine was ok, but I'm fairly certain someone else will get it. :(
My tip is basically think about potential questions and how you would answer them. What kind of job did you apply to?
mysticlady3 1st-May-2012 12:38 am (UTC)
At Macy's, part time retail associate.
lone_concertina 1st-May-2012 12:55 am (UTC)
Okay, ignore my part about office culture. :)
mysticlady3 1st-May-2012 01:18 am (UTC)
LOL what questions should I ask. What kind of things should I research about Macy's?
theguindo 1st-May-2012 02:51 am (UTC)
Is it a group interview? I've been to a Macy's group interview before so I have a few tips for that.
mysticlady3 1st-May-2012 03:29 am (UTC)
I have no idea. But I'd like to hear your tips.
theguindo 1st-May-2012 03:42 am (UTC)
Okay, so. You should research the history of the company, because they asked a lot of questions along those lines. Know that the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade exists as a way for the company to give back to the community. If you can answer that one, they give you some major brownie points.

Raise your hand a lot and show a willingness to answer or ask questions. They want to see people who contribute meaningfully to a discussion. And, of course, it makes you stand out and forces them to notice you. They won't pick the people who fade into the background.

And be the best-dressed person in the room, but that goes without saying. Be the classiest motherfucker there and you will catch their eye.

Basically it boils down to get their attention in the most positive way possible. Don't answer ALL the questions, but answer several, and answer correctly, and ask intelligent questions where appropriate.
mysticlady3 1st-May-2012 03:47 am (UTC)
Thanks!

What should I research about Macy's? I got the basics of when/where it was founded.
theguindo 1st-May-2012 04:18 am (UTC)
I can't remember the specifics of what was asked, but know a lot about their image and brand, what they do outside of running their stores, and anything that sounds like a selling point to make people like them.
mysticlady3 1st-May-2012 04:33 am (UTC)
Okay thanks.

How about attire? Having a bit of a crisis.
lone_concertina 1st-May-2012 12:54 am (UTC)
Let your real personality show. The first interview is almost always more about matching your personality with the office culture than anything else, while the second tends to delve more into your qualifications and skills.

Don't ask about pay or benefits unless they bring it up.

Make sure you have three great questions prepared to ask at the end of the interview. I have a list of about 10 that I cycle through depending on how the interview went, but it mostly needs to revolve around showing you've prepared for the interview by researching the company and how you'd fit into it.
bellichka 1st-May-2012 01:33 am (UTC)
omg would you care to share those ten questions lol
lone_concertina 1st-May-2012 02:05 am (UTC)
1. How is success measured in this role? (makes you look results-oriented)
2. Is it a new position or is it being backfilled? (gives you an idea of the timeline for hiring and the opportunity to ask if the person who was in it before was promoted)
3. What are the opportunities for advancement, including education and promotions? (makes you look ambitious and upwardly mobile within the company)
4. What other positions would you be working with on a regular basis and how do the roles interact? (makes you look like a team player)
5. Why do you enjoy working at [the company]? (makes you look invested in their office culture)
6. What's an average day like for this position and what sort of challenges would I face? (makes you look introspective)
7. How would I support your role in this job? (only ask if the interviewer would be your supervisor)
8. http://www.askamanager.org/2009/12/great-question-to-ask-your-interviewer.html
9. What is your hiring timeline? (keeps you from wondering what happened if you don't hear from them for two weeks)
10. If the interview has gone really well and you feel confident, ask if they have any hesitations about you being the perfect person for the job. That gives you a chance to clear up any misconceptions they have about you and didn't ask. And it forces them to think about how great you are.

Honestly, I interview so much that I feel like I should be a career coach instead of my current career path. I always get complimented on my interview skills and how well I present myself but my last job shit talks me and no one will hire me for it.
mysticlady3 Not OP but...1st-May-2012 02:34 am (UTC)
Thanks for this.
coraki 1st-May-2012 02:36 am (UTC)
thank you for sharing
cruel_disorder 1st-May-2012 03:13 am (UTC)
This is great, thanks so much!
kaowolfie 1st-May-2012 04:19 am (UTC)
omg, thank you. I NEVER know what to say, beyond asking what the timeline is.

*saves this on her phone*

Also, seriously, have you thought about doing interview skills coaching? You might be able to pick up some cash that way.

Edited at 2012-05-01 04:20 am (UTC)
lone_concertina 1st-May-2012 01:31 pm (UTC)
I don't know how to get into it so I use my skills for good and help out friends. Thanks for the boost of confidence though!
strandedinaber 1st-May-2012 05:19 pm (UTC)
Totally copying and pasting this for my next set of interviews. Thanks! These are fantastic.
bellichka OMG GURL17th-Aug-2012 01:45 pm (UTC)
So I bookmarked this when you commented. All SUCH amazing questions - I can't believe I never responded to you, I suck. Anyways, I used a whole bunch of these for two rounds of interviews I went through lately, and as of yesterday I got the job! For every question I asked they were like "that's a really good question," and I was like "BISH, I KNOW, lone_concertina TOLD ME WHAT TO ASK AND I PRINTED IT FROM THE INTERNET" lololol. Just wanted to say thank you, and I hope you're having luck in your job search despite your shit-talking ex-job ♥
lone_concertina Re: OMG GURL17th-Aug-2012 01:50 pm (UTC)
Yay, congrats! I actually found a job at the end of May at a nonprofit doing exactly what I've wanted to do all along, so yay all around!
bellichka Re: OMG GURL17th-Aug-2012 02:00 pm (UTC)
YAY FOR US!!!! *eats confetti* *throws cake*

What's your new job? I'm the assistant to the program coordinator of a music/dance school :)
lone_concertina Re: OMG GURL17th-Aug-2012 02:01 pm (UTC)
Proposal development coordinator and graphic designer!
bellichka Re: OMG GURL17th-Aug-2012 02:12 pm (UTC)
WOW that sounds awesome! I just got my MS in International Studies, and had been looking for jobs in that field within higher education (i.e. working with international student, study abroad students, etc.). Had applied for a few jobs, applied to my alma mater*, and was like, okay, I guess this isn't going to work out, so let's set our sights a little lower.

*I applied for a position with my undergrad college for the Program Coordinator with the umbrella organization for the multicultural organizations on campus. They required a bachelor's, no experience. I had my MS in International Studies, I LIVED in the dorm in which I'd be working, I wrote a phenomenal cover letter all about how my international experiences there inspired me to get my MS in an international-related field, I participated in so many international/multicultural organizations on campus, I had my former German prof write the head of the program - who is her PERSONAL FRIEND - a letter of recommendation for me... and I didn't get past the HR screening. How shitty is that? I got a generic fucking email from HR (and this is AFTER I did follow-up emails and calls and heard nothing). I'm not saying they had to roll out the red carpet, or that I should've been handed the job just b/c I'm an alumnus, but.... JFC. I've had a couple friends suggest I email the president of the college and be like "just making you aware that THIS is how your HR department treats alumni, and it's shitty", and I'm strongly considering it.
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