ONTD Political

Bristol Palin: Too much 'Glee' in Obama decision

10:30 pm - 05/10/2012
President Barack Obama's endorsement Wednesday of same-sex marriage didn't please Bristol Palin. The daughter of former Alaska governor and 2008 vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin took to her blog Thursday to slam the president for taking political cues from his two daughters, who she suggested were watching too much television.

In an ABC News interview, Obama explained how his family helped influence his "evolution" on the issue of marriage, saying his daughters Malia and Sasha have "friends whose parents are same-sex couples."

"It wouldn't dawn on them that somehow their friends' parents would be treated differently," Obama said. "And frankly that's the kind of thing that prompts a change of perspective - not wanting to somehow explain to your child why somebody should be treated differently when it comes to the eyes of the law."

Palin, in her blog post, expressed a different view.

"While it's great to listen to your kids' ideas, there's also a time when dads simply need to be dads," wrote Palin.

She continued, "In this case, it would've been helpful for him to explain to Malia and Sasha that while her friends parents are no doubt lovely people, that's not a reason to change thousands of years of thinking about marriage. Or that – as great as her friends may be – we know that in general kids do better growing up in a mother/father home. Ideally, fathers help shape their kids' worldview."


Palin bemoaned the fact that Republican women running for office are sometimes quizzed on the role their families will play in their governing, but that Obama isn't pressed on acknowledging the impact his children make in his decision-making.

"So let me get this straight – it's a problem if my mom listened too much to my dad, but it's a heroic act if the President made a massive change in a policy position that could affect the entire nation after consulting with his teenage daughters?" Palin wondered.

The decision to back same-sex marriage was a missed opportunity for Obama, Palin wrote.

"In this case, it would've been nice if the President would've been an actual leader and helped shape their thoughts instead of merely reflecting what many teenagers think after one too many episodes of Glee," Palin wrote, referencing the popular television show about high schoolers.


Source


"Or that – as great as her friends may be – we know that in general kids do better growing up in a mother/father home. Ideally, fathers help shape their kids' worldview." Oh yeah? How's Levi doing with that whole child-rearing thing these days?
natyanayaki 11th-May-2012 09:21 pm (UTC)
And what's the point of bringing skin color into this? Should my white friend, who is unhappy with Obama's energy policies be afraid to speak up because some people will over-look his feelings as "white privilege"? I'm not saying she's not bigoted, I just don't understand the purpose of using one's own bigotry to challenge someone else's bigotry. I don't think it helps at all. Could her statements come from a racist stand-point? Perhaps, but I don't think a criticism is the equivalent of calling him "boy." And there's just so much MORE to focus on, and since she didn't refer to race (as far as I remember) I think it's extremely counter-productive to try to fight assumed racism, with more racism.

"Sadly, I don't ever see this happening when unaware people speak up. What I see happening is 1. more ignorant people feeling empowered to spout their hateful crap until they 2. drown out voices of reason, tolerance and diversity and actually end up shaping public policy."

You might be right, or while intelligent, reasonable voices might be quiet at first in the long run it might benefit society. When the "crazies" are quiet, people can pretend they don't exist, when they're screaming, defiling...and even worse...they have to be recognized and faced...of course that's assuming that people will give a fuck and tune out of whatever (the Kardashians, the play-offs) long enough to pay attention to the real world. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with someone who enjoys the Kardashians, sports or whatever...but I wish some people would make a little more room for other things, you know?
lamardeuse 12th-May-2012 03:36 am (UTC)
Should my white friend, who is unhappy with Obama's energy policies be afraid to speak up because some people will over-look his feelings as "white privilege"?

And once more, hyperbole trumps any discussion of race in American society. No, your friend shouldn't be afraid to speak up about Obama's policies. But Bristol Palin should not question a black man's adequacy as a parent in her criticism of his policies, because that has a shitload of racially charged baggage going way, way, way back.

I think it's extremely counter-productive to try to fight assumed racism, with more racism.

You're saying that my calling out Bristol Palin on her white privilege is racist? Uh, sorry, no, that's not racism.


ETA:
and since she didn't refer to race (as far as I remember)

Displays of racism and/or privilege are not contingent on the person saying "OMG YOU'RE BLACK" or something similar. This is what racism looks like:



The fact that Governor Brewer and her ilk would never pull this shit on a white President? That's racism. And I seriously doubt she is saying "OMG YOU'RE BLACK" out loud there, but she's saying it all the same.

Edited at 2012-05-12 03:51 am (UTC)
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