ONTD Political

North Carolina Pastor: Pen In ‘All The Lesbians And Queers’ With An Electrified Fence...

11:20 am - 05/22/2012
... Wait For Them To ‘Die Out’

North Carolina Pastor Charles Worley shared with his congregation this weekend how he thinks the country should deal with the scourge of gay men and lesbians: Lock them into a pen with an electrified fence, drop food down to them, and because they can’t reproduce, they will die out.

The Pastor’s leper colony-esque proposal came in response to the president’s endorsement of same-sex marriage, which he said “anybody with any sense” would be against. Worley explained that the idea of two men kissing makes him “pukin’ sick,” so he developed a proposal to “get rid of all the lesbians and queers”:

WORLEY: I figured a way out — a way to get rid of all the lesbians and queers. But I couldn’t get it passed through Congress. Build a great big large fence, 150 or 100 miles long. Put all the lesbians in there. Fly over and drop some food. Do the same thing with the queers and the homosexuals. Have that fence electrified so they can’t get out. Feed ‘em, and– And you know what? In a few years they’ll die out. You know why? They can’t reproduce.

These comments are in line with other anti-gay religious leaders in the state, like Sean Harris, who said parents should “crack” their children’s “limp wrist.” Harris walked back his statements, but Worley emphasized in his speech that he did, in fact, “mean to say that.”

http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2012/05/21/487707/north-carolina-electric-pen/
martyfan 22nd-May-2012 06:27 pm (UTC)
Bigoted assholes like this are the reason why I don't associate myself with the church anymore. I still believe in Jesus and all that jazz, but the modern rendition of Christianity basically has nothing to do with the guy.
spyral_out 22nd-May-2012 06:29 pm (UTC)
Samesies.

Well, sort of. Does it count if I'm an atheist who thinks Jesus was the best role model in the history of ever? I think it counts.
martyfan 22nd-May-2012 06:33 pm (UTC)
I'd count it, you're just a bit further down the sliding scale than me. :) I haven't really found a word to call myself, because Christian tends to be associated with homophobes and so forth, and Christ-follower sounds too pretentious. I just want everyone to do what makes them spiritually happy, and if that involves believing there isn't a god or gods, then that's none of my business. I live in fundie country so I can't really say that openly though.

/tangent
spyral_out 22nd-May-2012 06:40 pm (UTC)
<333333333333333 for you
kyra_neko_rei 22nd-May-2012 07:14 pm (UTC)
I personally go with "Christopagan Universalist" when I need to describe it succinctly, but I'm not completely happy with that either.

I kind of like "follower of Christ" because there's a sort of connotation of the early days of Christianity, when they were just a small group being all loving at people, and the question it brings up of "where did He go?" which is generally "in amongst the not-powerful," which is a lovely rejection of that aspect of today's Christianity that is so much based on status and dominance and "come join us on the winning side, we're going to rule the world!"

But then I can see how it could be viewed as pretentious.
rjdaae 22nd-May-2012 07:47 pm (UTC)
I haven't really found a word to call myself, because Christian tends to be associated with homophobes and so forth, and Christ-follower sounds too pretentious. I just want everyone to do what makes them spiritually happy, and if that involves believing there isn't a god or gods, then that's none of my business. I live in fundie country so I can't really say that openly though.


Same here. :(
jettakd 23rd-May-2012 02:07 am (UTC)
Same <3
celtic_thistle 23rd-May-2012 02:38 am (UTC)
I'm with you--weird agnostic-New Age hybrid who thinks the ACTUAL figure of Jesus was pretty cool and had some good ideas.
lollycunt 22nd-May-2012 07:31 pm (UTC)
I don't blame you. It makes me sad that people like this are the most vocal about their religion. Most of the religious people I know are non-hateful non-crazies, but of course they don't go around bullying people in the name of Jesus so you'd never know about their religion unless you saw them in church.

I just call the fundies old testament christians tbh, they obviously missed what the whole second half of the bible was all about.
kaowolfie 22nd-May-2012 09:13 pm (UTC)
The depressing thing with a decent portion of the non-hateful non-crazies is that they feel like somehow they're not loving their co-religionists if they point out the fuckery. I had one person tell me that calling people out for abusing Christianity for hateful and violent ends = risking being the Pharisee on the street corner.

which I don't get, but whatever. It just makes it hard to buy that they care as much as they say they do.
the_gabih 22nd-May-2012 08:31 pm (UTC)
Oh snap. Like, I know there are churches near me who profess to be LGBT-friendly, but I don't want to take that chance again.
spyral_out 22nd-May-2012 08:54 pm (UTC)
SPYRAL_OUT TO THE RESCUE

I go to a Unitarian Universalist church. I'm an atheist now, but it's still nice to experience the sort of community environment I grew up with. Only now, they're coolpeeps! They don't require you be any particular faith to attend. There's a gay minister, a Jewish minister, an atheist minister, and they have spiritual leaders from all walks of life come to talk.

Each year of Sunday school focuses on educating kids about a different religion, and 7th grade is sex ed! No, seriously - like condoms and STDs and orientations and responsibility and stuff. Legit sex-positive sex ed.

And omg don't even get me started on the social activism stuff. It's lovely.

Of course, each congregation varies, but in general UUs are fantastic folks to be around. Check it out. I hope it works for you if you do. :)
martyfan 22nd-May-2012 09:04 pm (UTC)
I actually recently found out there's a UU church near where I live, as well! I went to a service once when I was visiting a friend in another state and I really liked it. The only thing holding me back is that my dad and basically everyone in my extended family are borderline fundamentalists, and I really can't afford to play the rebel right now. Maybe when I can afford to live on my own, I'll give it a go.

But in any case, I must second this recommendation! The one I went to in Austin was pretty chill.
akisawana 22nd-May-2012 09:08 pm (UTC)
Seconding the UU churches -ask if they're a "welcoming congregation." All UU churches are LGBT-friendly, but welcoming congregations have made a commitment to a special emphasis on making LGBT folk feel welcome and activism for LGBT issues. The church I was raised in is welcoming and it was awesome.
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