ONTD Political

‘Slutty Wednesday’: NY high-school students protest dress code

2:14 pm - 06/07/2012
Stuyvesant High School is considered one of New York City's top public high schools, but some of the students there think a recently imposed dress code is just dumb.

The New York Post reports that about 100 students decided to protest the code, which bans girls from exposing their shoulders, midriffs, lower backs, bras and underwear, by having a "Slutty Wednesday," during which they intentionally broke the conservative dress standards.

"We work our asses off here, and school is about learning. Clothing is not important," ninth-grader Lucy Greider told the Post. Greider says she's been brought into the office 10 times this year for violating the dress code, which was introduced last fall. "A lot of the classrooms don't have a/c's and when it is 80 degrees outside and it is really hot, it's perfectly OK to show a little skin."



A 2010 poll by the National Center for Education Statistics found that about 57 percent of public schools enforce some kind of dress code. In addition, 19 percent of public schools require school uniforms, a 12 percent increase over the previous decade.

Dress codes, including school uniforms, often drift in and out of the public debate. However, more restrictive dress codes are usually reserved for private school systems. In 1996, President Bill Clinton stirred up controversy when he had the Department of Education distribute manuals to all of the nation's 16,000 school districts on how they could legally enforce school uniform policies without violating the First Amendment.



source, with video.

edit: all right, mea culpa for not posting this article, which explains the really shitty sexism and sizeism that this policy enforces....which is why the students adopted the term "slutty wednesday" in the first place. i hope this will clarify things/chasten some of you.
lizzy_someone 8th-Jun-2012 02:37 am (UTC)
If you sign my paychecks, then fine, go to town, tell me what to wear. If you're being paid to teach me and I'm required by law to be taught by you, then I really don't see why you should get to dictate my wardrobe. (Barring, like, racist/misogynist/homophobic/transphobic/etc. content, violent threats, and graphic sexual content. And nakedness because it's unhygienic.) Also, what constitutes "showing too much skin" is subjective to the point of meaninglessness. Some people consider women with uncovered faces to be showing too much skin.
walkwithheroes 8th-Jun-2012 07:31 pm (UTC)
If you're being paid to teach me and I'm required by law to be taught by you, then I really don't see why you should get to dictate my wardrobe.

But, the school board decides dress codes. Usually with input from parents and teachers and students. At least that is how it is in my city. And, dress codes are everywhere: businesses, public buildings, universities, etc.


Also, what constitutes "showing too much skin" is subjective to the point of meaninglessness. Some people consider women with uncovered faces to be showing too much skin.

And that's not right. But, if I'm teaching children (and I do high school freshmen children) I don't want to see their underwear or their butts. Boys, girls, I don't care: pull up your pants, if you lean over and I see most of your butt, than you need an extra half inch. Call me what you want, but that's the way I feel. As a future teacher, I have certain feelings about what children should wear in my classroom.

That said: slut shaming does nothing but harm. Looking at those pictures, those girls are dressed just fine for the summer heat.
lizzy_someone 11th-Jun-2012 02:44 am (UTC)
Yeah, okay, I can get behind the "I don't want to see your butts" doctrine.
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