ONTD Political

Freedom party’s Norbert Hofer congratulates independent rival Alexander Van der Bellen and says he is ‘endlessly sad’




The rightwing populist candidate for the Austrian presidency has conceded defeat and congratulated his Green-backed independent rival on winning the election.

In a Facebook post published shortly after the first exit poll, Norbert Hofer of the anti-immigration Freedom party said: “I congratulate Alexander Van der Bellen for his success and ask all Austrians to pull together and work together.”

Read more...Collapse )



*happydance* I'm so relieved, I was mentally prepared for Hofer and now this! :)

Queen Hillary Blames Ghost of Ronald Regan for Losing Election.

It is now becoming clear that Clinton’s ground game — the watchword for defenders of her alleged competence — was actually under-resourced and poorly executed. Like so much else in this election, her field strategy was hostage to the colossal arrogance and consequent incompetence of the liberal establishment.

At the heart of the failure was the notion of the “new emerging majority.” According to this argument — pushed by, among others, John Judis and Ruy Teixeira — women, Latinos, blacks, and skilled professionals who support the Democrats were becoming the demographic majority. Thus the traditional white working-class base of the Democratic Party could be sidelined.

Back in July Chuck Schumer summed it up: “For every blue-collar Democrat we lose in western Pennsylvania, we will pick up two moderate Republicans in the suburbs in Philadelphia, and you can repeat that in Ohio and Illinois and Wisconsin.”

From this theory and strategy flowed a deeply flawed set of tactics, and a badly fumbled get-out-the-vote (GOTV) effort.

A labor organizer in Ohio, who wished to remain anonymous, reports that Clinton’s early GOTV effort there focused on Republicans in the mistaken belief a significant number of them could be peeled away. This play largely failed. And it also involved serious opportunity costs: traditional Democratic constituencies like African Americans and the white working class were neglected, and Clinton ended up badly under-performing Obama among both groups, especially in the Rust Belt.

Only in the last two weeks, according to this labor source, did the Democratic Party outreach effort really switch back to traditional Democratic voters. By then, it was too late. Due to lack of preparation, the voter lists guiding the effort had not been updated. Because poorer voters tend to relocate more frequently than home-owning suburbanites, many addresses were wrong. And for lack of more frequent contact the campaign was often unsure about the voters’ current political attitudes.

And when the campaign finally showed up in the African-American, Latino, and white working-class areas they got lots of “so you only come by once every four years?”
Read moreCollapse )

Source: Garbage In, Garbage Out

'I spent 87 days going to every small town and fair and fish fry and VFW hall,' Obama said.

President Barack Obama didn’t quite blame his ally Hillary Clinton for causing her stunning loss to Donald Trump last week — but he chided her for not focusing on reaching out to white, non-urban voters like he did in 2008 and 2012.

Read more...Collapse )

SOURCE

Please let me know if I should add or remove any tags!

On July 30, 2003, Cannon Mills died.

The Kannapolis, N.C. textile factory, which after its 1887 inception bloomed into what was at one time the largest textile-producing factory in the nation, had long been one of the largest employers in rural North Carolina.

The company was the town, so to speak. In constructing its factory town, the Cannon family funded the building of a police department, a post office, schools, churches, and mill houses on surrounding land. The town’s main entertainment hub, complete with the still-operating and always pleasant GEM Theatre ($5 tickets! $2 sodas! $4 large popcorns!) sprouted next door. The company, though combative with union organizers from the start (multiple Cannon Mills ownership groups squashed multiple unionization efforts spanning from the 1920s to late 1990s, to the workers’ ultimate loss) established sentimental good will with its employees early on, becoming the first company in the nation to roll out life insurance for its employees when it did so in 1912. Other industries entered Kannapolis’s private business sector in the textile giant’s 116-year existence, but the town’s economic core was Cannon Mills.

In July 2003, when Cannon Mills’s owner went bankrupt, more than 4,000 workers living in Kannapolis lost their main source of income overnight. To put that in perspective, 11.7 percent of the town’s total 36,910 occupants—77 percent of whom were white and 30 percent of whom were in families with children, according to the 2000 U.S. Census—instantly became unemployed. Next door, in my hometown of China Grove, N.C., 560 people, or 15 percent of the town’s 3,651 dwellers, were out a job. It was the largest permanent mass layoff in the state’s history.

At 10 years old, I didn’t understand their tears. I didn’t understand them any more at 13 when people gathered en masse to gawk, cheer, or weep as they watched the smokestacks topple. I understood only that many people were depressed and confused. And as history will explain better than I, people, on a mass scale, don’t stay confused for long—they adapt and become content with the new norm, or they become pissed off. Kannapolis, like many, many other small towns across America, got pissed off.

In the three years between the shuttering of the factory’s doors and the final implosion, California billionaire David Murdock, the former owner of Cannon Mills and current chairman of Dole Foods, announced his latest project: the North Carolina Research Campus. On the same ground that was once home to the textile factories, a sprawling campus would rise, with buildings occupied by research teams from Duke, UNC, Appalachian State, and other North Carolina universities. The multi-million dollar effort was pitched in the local paper as an excellent move to create jobs, boost the economy, and show a public focus on science and education.

Fewer than 700 people are currently employed at the research campus. Job numbers are not an indicator of how successful efforts in researching and combating diseases are or will be, but the fact remains that 700 degree-requiring jobs do not 4,000 factory jobs make. According to UNC-Chapel Hill’s state population education data, 12.5 percent of Kannapolis’s adult population possessed at least a bachelor’s degree in 2000—the national average at the time was roughly 24 percent, per the census. By the time the N.C. Research Campus opened in 2008, Kannapolis’s number increased, but only slightly, to 14.4 percent.

Read moreCollapse )

Source: Growing Up In A Trump Town
Donald Trump is the president-elect, governing alongside a Republican Congress and a soon-to-be conservative Supreme Court. But some, like Bloomberg View columnist Conor Sen, are offering liberals a bit of hope, arguing that Democrats could dominate in the 2018 midterms elections. Then they could limit Trump’s ability to enact his terrifying political agenda, at least in the second half of his term.

It’s a comforting idea, but it’s wrong.

The Republicans currently hold a slim majority in the Senate, with 51 Republicans to 48 Democrats. For the Democrats to win the majority in the 2018 midterms, they would need to maintain the 48 seats they currently have and flip three Republican seats. However, just eight Republicans will be up for re-election in two years, and most represent solidly red states. The exception is Dean Heller from Nevada—the state voted for Hillary Clinton in the presidential election, and it also elected a Democrat, Catherine Cortez Masto, to fill the seat of retiring Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid.

Read more...Collapse )

SOURCE

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Black women made history in Jefferson County, Alabama.

In a great stride for representation Tuesday, nine black women were elected to become judges in majority Democratic Jefferson County, Alabama, The Birmingham Times reported.

The black women who came out on top in the district and circuit courts are all Democrats. Javan Patton, Debra Bennett Winston, Shera Craig Grant, Nakita “Niki” Perryman Blocton, Tamara Harris Johnson, Elisabeth French, Agnes Chappell, Brendette Brown Green and Annetta Verin are to be sworn in next January.

French, who was re-elected to Jefferson County’s Circuit Court, told The Birmingham Times that she believes her hard work and years of experience helped to propel her to elected office.

“I think the people don’t necessarily just support you just because of your race and gender. I think voters expect more than that. They look at our qualifications and make a decision about who they can trust with the leadership position,” she said.

Tuesday night was a big night for women of color across the states ― not just in local politics, but in federal positions, as well. Three women of color, Catherine Cortez Masto, Tammy Duckworth and Kamala Harris, were elected to the Senate. Stephanie Murphy and Pramila Jayapal were also elected to the House. Next year, there will be 38 women of color serving in Congress, bringing us a little bit closer to shattering that glass ceiling.

Source
Omarosa: Trump already has an enemies list

Omarosa Manigault, a former contestant on The Apprentice, and Donald Trump advocate, says those who vote against Trump will be placed on a special “list.”

“It’s so great our enemies are making themselves clear so that when we get into the White House, we know where we stand,” Omarosa told the Independent Journal Review at Trump’s election night party in New York City.

Omarosa specifically mentioned Sen. Lindsey Graham, who announced on Twitter that he voted for another candidate.

“If [Graham] felt his interests was with that candidate, God bless him. I would never judge anybody for exercising their right to and the freedom to choose who they want, but let me just tell you, Mr. Trump has a long memory and we’re keeping a list,” Omarosa told the Journal Review.

Graham tweeted that he couldn't bring himself to vote for Trump and Hillary Clinton wasn't an option, so he voted for a friend.

In the prez race, voting for Hillary Clinton was always a non-starter and I couldn’t go where Donald Trump wanted to take the USA & GOP. #2
— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) November 8, 2016

I voted @Evan_McMullin for President. I appreciate his views on a strong America and the need to rebuild our military. #3
— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) November 8, 2016

And if political enemy lists seem more akin to House of Cards than real life, think again. Politico reports that Clinton aides compiled a "hit list" in 2008 after she lost to Barack Obama.

Source

Hillary's Hit List


Feel free to use this post to discuss the election, voting experiences, predictions, hopes and dreams, or whatever else that's on your mind today!



Some resources are below. If you have others to add, please let me know and I'll add them to the post (gotta say "hey OP you should add this to the post" or something to distinguish it from people just posting whatever):

Stream Live Election ResultsCollapse )

Interactive Trackers and MapsCollapse )

In case you need something cute in your life todayCollapse )
The North Carolina NAACP sued the state on Monday, claiming a purge targeted black voters.



WASHINGTON ― County election boards in North Carolina must restore the registrations of voters removed from the polls, U.S. District Judge Loretta Biggs ordered on Friday.

The order follows an emergency hearing held on Wednesday to address allegations that election officials in Beaufort, Moore and Cumberland counties had removed voters from the rolls due to campaign mailers that were returned as undeliverable.

The North Carolina NAACP sued the state on Monday, claiming the purge targeted black voters. [OP note: Earlier article stated that "Black voters account for 91 of the 138 canceled registrations (or over 65 percent) in Beaufort County, according to the North Carolina NAACP, even though black people are only 25.9 percent of that county’s population."] The Justice Department submitted a statement of interest in the lawsuit on Monday night supporting the assertion that removing voters from the rolls en masse is a violation of the National Voter Registration Act.

Biggs, who during the hearing called the state’s process for removing voters’ names “insane,” said in her ruling that the NC NAACP had proved that names were unfairly removed.

“The Court finds that a narrowly tailored injunction is warranted to ensure that eligible voters are not deprived of their right to participate in the upcoming election due to a flawed process engaged in by the State and County Boards, which this Court has determined likely violates the NVRA,” Biggs said in her decision.

More quotes and numbersCollapse )
Rio Mayor’s Race Pits Evangelical Marcelo Crivella Against Socialist

Evangelical bishop is one of several unorthodox candidates favored to win in Brazil elections Sunday



RIO DE JANEIRO—He has called Catholics “demonic,” accused Hindus of “child sacrifice” and denounced homosexuality as “malign.” Now Marcelo Crivella may soon have a new name for himself: mayor of Rio de Janeiro.

A senator and bishop of an evangelical megachurch, Mr. Crivella is the front-runner in the race to lead Brazil’s second-largest city. Recent polls show him more than 10 points ahead of his socialist challenger Marcelo Freixo heading into the final round of voting on Sunday.

Mr. Crivella, a member of the fledgling Brazilian Republican Party or PRB, is among a string of unorthodox candidates challenging the political establishment this election season. Voter disgust is rampant following a corruption scandal that helped sweep former President Dilma Rousseff from power this year and which has tainted all major parties.

In Rio, residents are fed up with rising crime, deteriorating public services and what many see as wasteful spending on the recent Olympic Games. In a city renowned world-wide for its sun-and-samba sensuality, Mr. Crivella has drawn strong backing from the city’s poor and working classes, many of whom have embraced conservative Pentecostal beliefs as a bulwark against the struggles of daily life.

Read more...Collapse )


Marcelo Crivella beat his opponent, socialist Marcelo Freixo, taking 59 percent of the votes in the municipal runoff election.

This page was loaded Feb 25th 2017, 7:10 am GMT.