Ladypolitik (ladypolitik) wrote in ontd_political,
Ladypolitik
ladypolitik
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ONTD_Political's PotD: May 5, 2010.


Late on the night of April 20th, 50 miles from the shore of Louisiana, a fire broke out aboard the Transocean Deepwater Horizon oil rig under lease by BP, with 126 individuals on board. After a massive explosion, all but 11 of the crew managed to escape as the rig was consumed by fire, later collapsing and sinking into the Gulf. Safeguards set in place to automatically cap the oil well in case of catastrophe did not work as expected, and now an estimated 5,000 barrels (over 200,000 gallons) of crude oil is pouring into the Gulf of Mexico every day - and could possibly continue to do so for months as complicated efforts are made to stop the leak. Collected here are several recent photos of the developing situation along Louisiana's Gulf Shore - one with the potential to eclipse the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in scope and damage.









A candlelight vigil for missing oil platform worker Adam Weise was held at the Yorktown Presbyterian Church, Friday evening April 23, 2010 in Yorktown, Texas. A family friend comforts Arlene Weise, Adam's mother.

The Victoria Advocate, Frank Tilley | AP Photo



Weathered oil from a leaking pipeline that resulted from last week's explosion and collapse of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana Tuesday, April 27, 2010.

Patrick Semansky | AP Photo



Crude oil sits on the surface of the water that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf.

Chris Graythen | Getty Images






Two brown pelicans and a flock of seagulls rest on the shore of Ship Island, Mississippi, as a boom line floats just offshore, April 29. Several hundred yards of boom line has been set up on the north side of the island to try and contain the oncoming oil spill. Crews are placing the boom in different areas on Coast waterways to help protect against an approaching oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico.

William Colgin | Biloxi Sun Herald/MCT



A worker helps clean the beach of debris as it is prepared for possible contamination on May 3, 2010 in Pass Christian, Mississippi.

Joe Raedle | Getty Images



Captain Michael Nguyen stands near his fishing boat in Venice, Louisiana, Thursday, April 29, 2010. Local fishermen are worried about how their industry will withstand a growing oil spill that resulted from last week's explosion and collapse of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana.

Patrick Semansky | AP Photo



A Hurricane Katrina-damaged car still sits half-submerged near cypress trees in Venice, Louisiana on Thursday, April 29, 2010. A region still recovering from the 2005 hurricane season is bracing for a growing oil spill that resulted from last week's explosion and collapse of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana.

Patrick Semansky | AP Photo



A boat works to collect oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana.  An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. 

Chris Graythen | Getty Images






A satellite image taken on April 26, 2010, shows an airplane (upper left) flying over part of the oil slick resulting from the explosion of the Transocean Deepwater Horizon oil rig, in the Gulf of Mexico.

DigitalGlobe | REUTERS






The growing oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico is captured in this image from NASA's (MODIS) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. This natural-color image acquired April 29, 2010 shows a twisting patch of oil nearly 125 km (78 mi) wide.

NASA Earth Observatory/Jesse Allen/University of Wisconsin SSEC



Clumps of oil are seen in the waters off of Chandeleur Sound, La., May 3.

Alex Brandon |  AP Photo



This aerial photo shows oil in the Gulf of Mexico, eight miles off the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River at the Southern tip of Louisiana on Wednesday, April 28, 2010. About 42,000 gallons of oil a day are leaking into the Gulf from the blown-out well drilled by the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. Eleven workers are missing and presumed dead. The cause of the explosion has not been determined.

Gerald Herbert | AP Photo



Oil, bottom right, is seen approaching the Louisiana Coast, top left, in this aerial photo taken 8 miles from shore, Wednesday, April 28, 2010.

Gerald Herbert | AP Photo











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