Ladypolitik (ladypolitik) wrote in ontd_political,
Ladypolitik
ladypolitik
ontd_political

ONTD_Political's PotD: May 28, 2010.


An untested procedure to plug the blown-out oil well in the Gulf of Mexico seemed to be working, officials said Thursday, but new estimates from scientists showed the spill has already surpassed the Exxon Valdez as the worst in U.S. history. A team of scientists trying to determine how much oil has been flowing since the offshore rig Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20 and sank two days later found the rate was more than twice and possibly up to five times as high as previously thought. The fallout from the spill has stretched all the way to Washington, where the head of the federal agency that oversees offshore drilling resigned under pressure Thursday. Even using the most conservative estimate, the new numbers mean the leak has grown to nearly 19 million gallons over the past five weeks, surpassing the size of the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, which at about 11 million gallons had been the nation's worst spill. Under the highest Gulf spill estimate, nearly 39 million gallons may have leaked, enough to fill 30 school gymnasiums.



Seawater covered with thick black oil splashes up in brown-stained whitecaps off the side of the supply vessel Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill containment efforts in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana Sunday, May 9, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



A tugboat moves through the oil slick on May 6, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. (Michael B. Watkins/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)



A Greenpeace activist steps through oil on a beach along the Gulf of Mexico on May 20, 2010 near Venice, Louisiana. (John Moore/Getty Images)



The crew of a Basler BT-67 fixed wing aircraft releases oil dispersant over parts of the oil spill off the shore of Louisiana in this May 5, 2010 photograph. (REUTERS/Stephen Lehmann/U.S. Coast Guard)



A pod of Bottlenose dolphins swim under the oily water Chandeleur Sound, Louisiana, Thursday, May 6, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)



A BP cleanup worker rakes oil from the beach on May 22, 2010 on Elmer's Island, Louisiana. Authorities closed the popular tourist beach to the public and media wishing to visit the beach must be escorted by a BP official. (John Moore/Getty Images)



A man holds a plastic bag with seawater and oil from the Gulf of Mexico oil spill south of Freemason Island, Louisiana May 7, 2010. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)



Specks of oil stick onto the foot of Maggie Grace Hurdle, 8, of Rosedale, Louisiana, as she walks along a beach in Grand Isle, Louisiana May 21, 2010. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner)



Oily water is seen off the side of the Joe Griffin supply vessel at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill containment efforts in the Gulf of Mexico on Saturday, May 8, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



Natural gas from the damaged Deepwater Horizon wellhead is burned off by the drillship Discoverer Enterprise May 16, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast Louisiana. (Patrick Kelley/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)



Oil washes onto the sides of a 100-ton concrete-and-steel pollution containment chamber as the mobile offshore drilling unit Q4000 lowers it into the water at the Deepwater Horizon site on May 6, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico . The chamber was designed to cap the oil discharge that was a result of the Deepwater Horizon incident. (Patrick Kelley/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images)



Collected oil burns on the water in this aerial view seven miles northeast of the Deepwater Horizon site over the Gulf of Mexico, May 18, 2010. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace)



Oil is seen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico about six miles southeast of Grand Isle, Louisiana May 21, 2010. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner)



One of the New harbor Islands is protected by two oil booms against the oil slick that has passed inside of the protective barrier formed by the Chandeleur Islands, as cleanup operations continue for the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster off Louisiana, on May 10, 2010. (MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)



Oil, scooped up with a bucket from the Gulf of Mexico off the side of the supply vessel Joe Griffin, coats the hands of an AP reporter at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, May 10, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



Workers attempt to secure an oil boom into place in an effort to protect the coast line from the massive oil spill near Hopedale, Louisiana May 10, 2010. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner)



Unemployed commercial fishermen and their families wait in line to receive handouts from New Orleans Catholic Charities on May 5, 2010 in Hopedale, Louisiana. Many local fishermen have been temporarily shut down but have been hired by British Petroleum (BP) to lay oil booms in sensitive areas. (Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)



Oil is scooped out of a marsh impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Redfish Bay along the coast of Louisiana, Saturday, May 22, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



An aerial view of the northern Chandeleur barrier islands shows sheens of oil reaching land, Thursday, May 6, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. The islands rest 20 miles from the main Louisiana coastline. (AP Photo/David Quinn)



A ship maneuvers and sprays water near a rig in heavy surface oil in this aerial view over the Gulf of Mexico May 18, 2010, as oil continues to leak from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace)



An oil soaked bird struggles against the oil slicked side of the HOS Iron Horse supply vessel at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana Sunday, May 9, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



An aerial view of the oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead, May 6, 2010. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra)



An outboard boat motor breaks up a thick layer of oil as Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal and Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser toured the oil-impacted marsh of Pass a Loutre on Wednesday, May 19, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



Boom to protect Louisiana's fragile wetlands is put into place on Lake Machias on May 9, 2010, following a massive oil spill that is threatening the state's coastal islands. (Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images)



Risers, the outer casings of oil drill pipes, are seen on the deck of the service vessel Joe Griffin as it prepares to head to Port Fourchon at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on May 11, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



Boat captain Preston Morris shows the oil on his hands while collecting surface samples from the marsh of Pass a Loutre, Louisiana on Wednesday, May 19, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)



The oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico is seen from a helicopter. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times / May 6, 2010)



Seen from a helicopter, oil swirls in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times / May 6, 2010)



A containment device aboard a boat awaits to be lowered into the water. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times / May 6, 2010)



Crews aboard ships in the gulf wait to lower a containment device to curtail the oil flow. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times / May 6, 2010)



Dead jellyfish float in the waters off the Chandeleur Islands. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 6, 2010)



A boat makes its way along the edge of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico near the Chandeleur Islands. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 5, 2010)



Oil floats on the surface about 12 miles from the Louisiana marshes. Shrimp boat operators nearby tried to mop up as much as they could. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times / May 5, 2010)



U.S. environmental workers in Pass Christian, Miss., clean up debris that was washed ashore by heavy storms. Some of the objects may have been contaminated by the oil spill in the gulf. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times / May 3, 2010)



Kyle Currie, 14, and Olivia Martina, a zoologist, attempt to capture a northern gannet affected by the oil spill. The bird was taken from an island off Gulfport, Miss., back to the mainland by boat. (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times / May 3, 2010)



The Alabama National Guard erects barriers against a growing oil slick that could reach the state's shores. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 3, 2010)



Troops position sandbags on the shores of Grand Isle, La., to prevent oil from reaching the wetlands. The oil slick is currently about 12 miles offshore. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 10, 2010)



Greenpeace senior campaigner Lindsey Allen takes water samples along a 20-yard area of marsh where oil is thick in concentration near the south pass of the Mississippi River. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 18, 2010)



At Grand Isle State Park, where the oil spill has come ashore, a laughing gull is unable to fly. It died overnight and was removed in the morning by authorities. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 22, 2010)



Terrance Castle of Houma, La., wipes the sweat off his head soon after beginning the cleanup of oil on a beach near Grand Isle. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 22, 2010)



BP Chief Executive Tony Hayward tours his company's cleanup operations at Port Fourchon. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 24, 2010)



Jonathan Henderson, center, of Gulf Restoration Network and a small group of environmentalists try to get their message to President Obama as his motorcade goes by in Louisiana. It was Obama's second visit to the region. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times / May 28, 2010)



Oil and oil sheen are seen off an island, top, in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La., Wednesday, May 5, 2010. (AP / Eric Gay)



Boaters make their way along the edge of the oil slick about a quarter mile from the east shore of the Chandeleur Islands in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana on Wednesday, May 5, 2010. (MCT / Los Angeles Times / Carolyn Cole)



Oil can be seen on a portion the Chandeleur Islands, but much more is about a quarter mile off shore in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana on Wednesday, May 5, 2010. (MCT / Los Angeles Times / Carolyn Cole)



Reporter Anderson Cooper is reflected in oil filled water during a tour of areas where oil has come ashore May 26, 2010 in Blind Bay, La. (Getty Images / Win McNamee)



Oil streaks into the Gulf of Mexico May 26, 2010 near Brush Island, Louisiana. (Getty Images / Win McNamee)



Oil floats ashore at the Grand Isle East State Park May 27, 2010 on Grand Isle, Louisiana. BP  and government officials are cautiously optimistic that the "top kill" solution of stopping the oil spill caused by the Deepwater Horizon disaster will be successful. (Getty Images / Win McNamee)



A hand covered with crude oil points to an oiled marsh where oil has come ashore May 26, 2010 near Brush Island, La. (Getty Images / Win McNamee)



Oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill found at Pass-A-Loutre, Louisiana, more than a week ago has still not been cleaned up on Wednesday, May 26, 2010. (MCT / Los Angeles Times / Carolyn Cole)



Media accompany Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal as he tours an area of Pass-A-Loutre on Wednesday, May 26, 2010, that was hit by oil over a week ago and has still not been cleaned up by BP  or the U.S. Coast Guard. (MCT / Los Angeles Times / Carolyn Cole)



A researcher surveys oil floating on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of La., Wednesday, May 26, 2010. (AP / Jae C. Hong)



Workers contracted by BP clean oil from the beach at the Grand Isle East State Park May 26, 2010 on Grand Isle, Louisiana. (Getty Images / Win McNamee)



Members of the Louisiana National Guard install floating dams designed to protect the beach from incoming oil at the Grand Isle East State Park May 27, 2010 on Grand Isle, La. (Getty Images / Win McNamee)



BP crews clean oil off of the beach at Port Fourchon, Louisiana, Monday, May 24, 2010. Oil was first spotted here on Wednesday, May 12. (MCT / Miami Herald / Steven Johnson)



A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) is washed at the International Bird Rescue Research Center in Fort Jackson, Louisian, May 26, 2010, to clean birds affected by oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead. (MCT / Greenpeace / Daniel Beltra)



A crab skirts tarballs of oil on a beach at sunrise on May 23, 2010 on Grand Isle, La. O (Getty Images / John Moore)


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