Ladypolitik (ladypolitik) wrote in ontd_political,
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ONTD_Political's PotD: August 9, 2010.


The 65th anniversary event at the site of the world’s first A-bomb attack echoed with the choirs of schoolchildren and the solemn ringing of bells Friday as Hiroshima marked the occasion. At 8:15 a.m. – the time the bomb dropped, incinerating most of the city – a moment of silence was observed.

On Aug. 6, 1945, during World War II, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. About 140,000 people were killed or died within months when the American B-29 “Enola Gay” bombed Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. Three days later, about 80,000 people died after the United States also bombed Nagasaki. Japan surrendered on Aug. 15, ending World War II. To this day, the bombings remain the only time nuclear weapons have been unleashed.

The United States decided to drop the bombs because Washington believed it would hasten the end of the war and avert the need to wage prolonged and bloody land battles on Japan’s main island. That concern was heightened by Japan’s desperate efforts to control outlying islands such as Iwo Jima and Okinawa as the Allies closed in.


Before the Atomic Bomb (Hiroshima):






















Commanding officer and pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets Jr. waves from the cockpit of his bomber plane at its base in Tinian, on August 6, 1945, shortly before take-off to drop the first atomic bomb over Hiroshima, Japan. The day before Tibbets named the B-29 Superfortress after his mother "Enola Gay."

(AP Photo)



The B-29 superfortress Enola Gay lands at its Tinian base after its atomic bombing mission over Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. 

(AP Photo)



This is a  photograph released by the U.S. government  in 1960 that shows the Little Boy atom bomb, the type detonated over Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. The bomb was 29 inches in diameter, 126 inches long and weighed 9,700 pounds with a yield equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT explosive.

(AP Photo)



In this undated handout picture from the U.S. Air Force, the ground crew of the B-29 "Enola Gay" which bombed Hiroshima, Japan on Aug. 6, 1945 with the "Little Boy" nuclear bomb, stands with pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, center, in the Marianas Islands. It was the first use of nuclear weapons in warfare.

(AP Photo/U.S. Air Force)



Smoke rises 20,000 feet above Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945 after the first atomic bomb was dropped during warfare. 

(AP Photo)



This picture made from the town of Yoshiura on the other side of the mountain north of Hiroshima, Japan, shows the smoke rising from the explosion of the atomic bomb at Hiroshima, Aug. 6, 1945. It was picked up from an Australian engineer at Kure, Japan. Note the radiation spots on the negative caused by the explosion of the A-bomb, almost ruining the film. 

(AP Photo)



Survivors of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare are seen as they await emergency medical treatment, on August 6, 1945, in Hiroshima, Japan. The explosion instantly killed more than 60,000 people, with ten of thousands others dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. 

(AP Photo)



A pall of smoke lingers over this scene of destruction in Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 7, 1945, a day after the explosion of the atomic bomb. 

(AP Photo)



U.S. President Harry Truman, left, back from the Potsdam conference, is shown at his White House desk with Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson in Washington, D.C., Aug. 8, 1945.   They discuss the atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. 

(AP Photo)



Crew members of 'The Great Artiste', B-29, that dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, gather around Major Charles W. Sweeney, North Quincy, Mass., upon landing at Mather Field near on Nov. 8, 1945. All are members of crew that participated in historic mission. From Left to Right are; Sgt. R. Gallagher, Chicago; S. Sgt. A. M. Spitzer, Bronx, New York, Capt. C.D. Albury, Miami, Fla., Capt. J.F. Van Pelt, Jr., Oak Hill, W. Va.; Lt. F. J. Olivi, Chicago; S. Sgt. E.K. Buckley, Lisbon, Ohio; T. Sgt. A. T. Dehart, Plainview, Tex., and M. Sgt. J.D. Kuharek, Columbus, Neb.

(AP Photo)



Nagasaki Type Bomb: This is the type of atomic bomb exploded over Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II, the Atomic Energy Commission and Defense Department said in releasing this photo in Washington, December 6, 1960. The weapon, known as the "Fat Man" type, is 60 inches in diameter and 128 inches long. The second nuclear weapon to be detonated, it weighed about 10,000 pounds and had a yield equivalent to approximately 20,000 tons of high explosive.

(AP Photo)



A giant column of smoke rises more than 60,000 feet into the air, after the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare explodes over the Japanese port town of Nagasaki, on August 9, 1945. Dropped by the U.S. Army Air Forces B-29 plane "Bockscar," the bomb killed more than 70,000 people instantly, with ten thousands dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. 

(AP Photo)



A massive column of billowing smoke, thousands of feet high, mushrooms over the city of Nagasaki, Japan, after an atomic bomb was dropped by the United States on Aug. 9, 1945. A B-29 plane delivered the blast killing approximately 70,000 people, with thousands dying later of radiation effects. The attack came three days after the U.S. dropped the world's first atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The attacks brought about Japan's unconditional surrender, and the war ended when the papers ofsurrender were accepted aboard the U.S. battleship Missouri on Sept. 2, 1945.

(AP Photo/U.S.Signal Corps)



An unidentified young boy carries his burned brother on his back Aug. 10, 1945 in Nagasaki, Japan. This photographs was not released to the public by the Japanese military but was disseminated to the world press by the United Nations after the war.

(AP Photo/United Nations, Yosuke Yamahata)


[TRIGGERING: photo screened]
A mother and child struggle to go on living, August 10, 1945, a day after the atomic bomb was dropped over Nagasaki, Japan. 

(AP Photo/United Nations)



The city of Nagasaki is shown as a teeming urban area, above, then as a flattened, desolate moonscape following the detonation of an atomic bomb, below.  Circles delineate the thousands of feet from ground zero. 

(AP Photo)



A few steel and concrete buildings and bridges are still intact in Hiroshima after the Japanese city was hit by an atomic bomb by the U.S., during World War II Sept. 5, 1945. 

(AP Photo/Max Desfor)



The Hiroshima explosion, recorded at 8:15am, August 6, 1945, is seen on the remains of a wristwatch found in the ruins in this 1945 United Nations photo.  The shadow of the small hand on the eight was burned in from the blast, making it appear to be the big hand.

  (AP Photo/United Nations)



About one month after the dropping of the first atomic bomb on Aug. 6, 1945, an allied correspondent examines the landscape of destruction at Hiroshima, Japan.

(AP Photo)


[TRIGGERING: photo screened]
A victim of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare is seen in September 1945, at the Ujina Branch of the First Army Hospital in Hiroshima. The thermic rays emitted by the explosion burned the pattern of this woman's kimono upon her back.

(AP Photo)



All but a few scattered structures in this section of Hiroshima, Japan, have virtually disappeared in this aerial view after the August 6 atomic bomb was dropped on the city.  This is the first original aerial view of the damage done by the nuclear bomb, released Sept. 1, 1945. 

(AP Photo/US Air Force)



The area around the Sangyo-Shorei-Kan (Trade Promotion Hall) area of Hiroshima is laid waste, after an atomic bomb exploded within 100 meters of here in 1945. 

(AP Photo)



A Japanese civilian salvages a piece of what was once a child's tricycle in Nagasaki, Sept. 17, 1945.  A nuclear bomb was dropped on the city, Aug. 9, 1945, destroying nearly everything within a four-mile area, and instantly killing thousands of civilians. 

(AP Photo/ACME/Stanley Troutman)


[TRIGGERING: photo screened]
In this picture provided by Japan's Association of the Photographers of the Atomic (Bomb) Destruction of Hiroshima, a nuclear bomb victim lies in quarantine on the island of Ninoshima in Hiroshima, Japan, 9,000-meter (9,843-yard) from the epicenter on Aug. 7, 1945, one day after the bombing by the United States. It was the first use of nuclear weapons in warfare.

(AP Photo/The Association of the Photographers of the Atomic Destruction of Hiroshima, Yotsugi Kawahara)



The city of Nagasaki is shown as a teeming urban area, above, then as a flattened, desolate moonscape following the detonation of an atomic bomb, below.  Circles delineate the thousands of feet from ground zero. 

(AP Photo)



A sacred Torii Gate stands erect over the completely destroyed area of a Shinto shrine in Nagasaki, in October 1945, after the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare was dropped by the U.S. over the Japanese industrial center. Due to its structure, the blast of the explosion could go around it, therefore leaving the arch intact. The bombing killed more than 70,000 people instantly, with ten thousands dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. 

(AP Photo)



Church services continued in the Nagarekawa Protestant Church in 1945 after the atomic bomb destroyed the church in Hiroshima.

(AP Photo/Nagarekawa Church)



This young man, a victim of the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare, is seen as he is lying sick on a mat, in Nagasaki, in late 1945. The bombing killed more than 70,000 people instantly, with ten thousands dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. 

(AP Photo)



Akira Yamaguchi shows his heavy scars, June 5, 1947, a result of the healing of burns sustained from the atomic bomb attack of Hiroshima. 

(AP Photo/U.S. Army)



A survivor of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare, Jinpe Teravama retains scars after healing of burns from the bomb explosion, Hiroshima, in June 1947.

(AP Photo)




Panoramic shots of Hiroshima and Nagasaki after destruction (click for largest image rendering):

















Hiroshima 65 years later (courtesy of dearmisterecho ):
































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